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Unexplored territory

 
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Sumobob2



Joined: 13 Aug 2003
Posts: 530
Location: Lenexa
Crumpet Stick: Chuck
First Played: 1996

PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 10:25 am    Post subject: Unexplored territory Reply with quote

Ah, lunchtime. Time to go on the crumpets boards and kill some time.

A goal occured yesterday that got me thinking about some territory we have yet to explore in crumpets strategy. Zach(k?), one of the new players yesterday, was up near the opposing team's goal. He practically dribbled the ball right into Ryan, Eric and Heather, all of whom were between him and said goal. He took a point-blank shot, and it went off of Ryan, but Zack(h?) stayed right with it (and was able to use his body to keep the ball close to the goal because his shot was from so close). He took another shot that went off someone and was headed out of bounds, but Zach(k?) dove and stopped it with his body, taking another shot to finish the play for a point. It was an amazing show of tenacity and there were elbows to be shared all around.

We've had lots of talk about good, strong shots from all over the place. But we've had very little talk about simply wading into the fray and putting the ball into the other teams goal by sheer force. Does anyone else think there might be something to this? I mean, 3 defenders can probably stop your shot. But what if the attacker is just a step behind the shot to try to push them out of the way and, essentially, walk the ball into the goal? It might result in one-point plays more often than two-pointers, but that's not the end of the world. I just wanted to see what others thought about this.
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dflynn08



Joined: 19 Sep 2004
Posts: 80




PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know that we have had many discussions about personal playing style and I think that this is another style of playing. It is an interesting strategy because, at least for the situation that you are describing, it requires tremendous reflexes but mostly luck. We all know that a crumpet is the most unpredictable thing on the planet so it would be very difficult to get this strategy to work reliably. My other concern about the style of play. Wading into the fray and using sheer force to score a goal, while gritty and result getting also increases the chance of injury for all those involved. I was experimenting earlier this year with playing tougher and trying to fight through certain situations wehen I thought it would work. I found that I hurt more and I caused a few injuries. (talk to Justin.) Anyway, if we are going to start "grinding" for goals I'd like to keep it as safe as possible
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SombraAla
Site Admin


Joined: 10 Aug 2003
Posts: 409
Location: North Kansas City
Crumpet Stick: Muramasa
First Played: 1998

PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 4:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In my opinion, the biggest problem with any dribbling based attack is... well... the dribbling. To put this into perspective, we have people who have played for years upon years now, and consistantly for quite a while too, and yet I don't know anyone who can dribble the crumpet and wll never lose it due solely to a weird bounce, mishit, etc. And before you think back to previous games to try to prove me wrong, realize that _most_ of the time we see 'sound' dribbling is when the crumpet handler has lots of space and doesn't have to hit the crumpet very often in order to move it a long way.... in some cases it's more akin to passing it to yourself than dribbling.

I think that dribbling will get better over the course of the next 10 years, but for the most part - it is hard. Not because it takes more athletic skill or anything - it's just to random...

Factor into this equation a number of opponents who want nothing more than to take the crumpet away from you and you have a serious situation. Yet what Robbie said is important as well... a key to dribbling, especially through opponents, is to ensure that when the crumpet does get hit or take a weird bounce that you're still behind it. You want to be somewhat behind the crumpet (in such a way that you are running into the space the crumpet just left)... if you have the crumpet way off to the side then one bump, mishit or a tiny tap by an opponent will reliquish your control over the crumpet.

So basically I don't think this will replace a strong shot by any means. If you have space to take a shot from a reasonable distance, then by all means - take it. If you _don't_ have space, I can figure two things you can do. A) look for a teammember who does have some space or B) bum rush the goal. A is first choice solely because the chances a teammate is nearby with an open shot is probably pretty good, especially if you have multiple opponents who are preventing you from taking a shot in the first place. Still, sometimes the defense is in all the right places or your teammates are in all the wrong ones... or sometimes they just don't think you'd ever try to walk it right into the goal.

In the long run, however, there is a more general and even 'better' concept to take out of this maneuver that Robbie described. That boils down to one word: Persistance. Persistance is gold in crumpets. Everyone misses and everyone gets the ball hit away from them, but if you keep on trying then you're going to do great. Sometimes 'older' people forget this (at least I think so) - we know the percentages in relation to how easily we could get the crumpet in this situation or whatnot... it's happened so many times that we think we already know the outcome to a mistake we make or whatnot. We end up watching a play or giving up on something when a more persistant player would keep right on at it. I've seen more veteran players get schooled by rookies simply because the rookie didn't know they were beat (and in fact, they weren't, since they managed to best the veteran).

I do want to make another comment but I'm going to put it into another reply...
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SombraAla
Site Admin


Joined: 10 Aug 2003
Posts: 409
Location: North Kansas City
Crumpet Stick: Muramasa
First Played: 1998

PostPosted: Tue Aug 15, 2006 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, one last thing in response to Robbie's post.
Quote:
He took another shot that went off someone and was headed out of bounds, but Zach(k?) dove and stopped it with his body, taking another shot to finish the play for a point.


I'd like to say that, from the mental picture I have of this, I think Robbie is describing the single most 'dangerous' part of the field (dangerous as in going to get scored on, not people getting injured). Actually, it is in conjunction with where the crumpet came from as well...

Basically, if a crumpet is in front of a goal and is deflected off to the right or left (think 'nickle' area, except in-bounds and ranging to almost halfway between goal-post and the side-line) and the crumpet can be saved from going out, that team will usually score. The dynamics of this 'magic' spot is that the defending team is not only out of position but also expecting it to go out. I say that the defending team is out of position because just prior to the crumpet making it there it was in front of the goal in some way and the defending team was (probably) doing a combination of blocking possible shots by the crumpet handler and either doing the same for other attacking players or preventing passes to them. When the crumpet is blocked off to the side - all the angles change and, unless your entire team has left you to take on the opposing goal by yourself, a teammate is going to be open (generally they're running towards you).

Now, the goalie is probably going to follow the crumpet and prevent a direct shot from whomever has the crumpet, but a simple pass backwards and towards the center of the goal can be 'deadly'. Even if the defending team gets to it first, they're probably running towards their own goal to get to it and would have to hit it in the opposite direction in which they are running. If the goalie doesn't follow the crumpet, a shot from that distance will surly go in, even if it is a tough angle... and there's always the third option of dribbling it back to the center of the goal yourself in order to 'come around' on it.

I realize this is pretty random and whatnot, but I had actually thought about this situation a good deal prior to now and felt it might be somewhat beneficial for people to hear about it. If you were unable to follow any of what I was just saying, well, I'm sorry - you'll have to ask me in person someday.
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